Spring Lectures 2018

April 6th to May 11th

The Atrium Building, McMaster Innovation Park
175 Longwood Ave., South. Click on Location Map

Understanding the 21st Century

How do we begin to understand the 21st century? Our world is a very complex and confusing place where change is happening at an ever faster pace. The speakers will cover a range of topics providing insights into this century’s problems and possibilities.

April 6th

Richard Heinzl

Richard Heinzl

Richard will share stories about his experiences with Médecins Sans Frontières and the world of medical innovation. He will talk about the people who inspired him and the place that he came from.

Richard Heinzl is a physician, humanitarian and entrepreneur whose current focus is technology and health care worldwide. He is Global Medical Director for WorldCare International, Inc. In this role, Dr. Heinzl provides consultation and oversight on the creation and delivery of medical second opinions to our members worldwide; engages with clients across North America and contributes to the strategic direction of the company.

Earlier in his career Heinzl was the founder of Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders Canada (MSF Canada), which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999. He has been a consultant to numerous health ventures, founder and CEO of MediSpecialist Corp., a dot-com era second opinion company and CEO of CardioView Inc., a medical imaging company in the field of cardiology.

He is a graduate of McMaster University’s DeGroote School of Medicine and completed postgraduate degrees related to global health at Harvard University and the University of Oxford. He is a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. In 2000 he received an Honorary Doctorate (LLD) from McMaster University and was named one of the “Hundred People Who Make a Difference” in Canada by Penguin Books. And in 2016 he received the Alumni Award of Merit from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public health. His Memoir, “Cambodia Calling” is published by Harper Collins.

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April 13th

Allison Sekuler

Allison Sekuler

The world is aging faster now than at any time in our history, and our understanding of the aging brain is changing just as fast. Whereas just a few decades ago it was believed that our brains stopped growing in childhood, we now know that new brain cells and brain connections can be created throughout our lifetimes. This talk will explore some of the evidence for the ideas that sometimes getting older means getting better, and that we can teach older brains new tricks.

Dr. Allison Sekuler is Vice-President, Research, and the Sandra A. Rotman Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience at Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, and a Professor in the Departments of Psychology (University of Toronto) and Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour (McMaster University). After completing a double-major BA in Mathematics and Psychology from Pomona College (1986), and a PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley (1990), Dr. Sekuler came to Canada as a faculty member at the University of Toronto. She moved to McMaster as the first Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience (2001-2011), and had a long and distinguished academic career, and served as Associate Vice-President Research, Acting Vice-President Research (two occasions), Associate Vice-President and Dean of Graduate Studies, and as a special advisor to the President.

Dr. Sekuler’s research focuses on cognitive neuroscience, vision science, neural plasticity and learning, aging, face perception, and neurotechnology. Her work is supported by NSERC and CIHR, and she has published over 100 scientific articles in leading journals such as Nature, Current Biology, and Neuron. She has a passion for science communication, having served as the President of the Royal Canadian Institute for Science, appearing frequently in national and international media discussing her own research and that of others, and founding several public science outreach lecture series and online initiatives. She has received numerous awards for communication, research, education, and leadership, including being named an Alexander Von Humboldt Fellow, an Ontario Research Scholar, and the recipient of a Hamilton Spectator Publisher’s Award for Educators. Dr. Sekuler also has a passion for the drums, which she recently took up as a personal experiment testing the hypothesis that learning an instrument keeps the brain young.

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April 20th

Doug Saunders

Doug Saunders

Hamilton and its surrounding region have played a significant role in Canada’s story of population, immigration and growth – and are likely to play a much larger role in the future. Doug Saunders draws from his new book Maximum Canada to look at the area’s role in keeping Canada’s population unnaturally small during earlier centuries, its current place in transition, and the important role it and similar post-industrial cities with post-secondary institutions will play in various scenarios designed to triple Canada’s population by the end of this century.

Doug Saunders is an author and journalist of Canadian and British citizenship. He is the author of the books Arrival City: The Final Migration and Our Next World (2011), The Myth of the Muslim Tide (2012) and Maximum Canada (2017) and is the international-affairs columnist for the Canadian national newspaper The Globe and Mail. He served as the paper’s London-based European bureau chief for a decade, after having run the paper’s Los Angeles bureau, and has written extensively from East Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, the Middle East and North Africa. He writes a weekly column devoted to the larger themes and intellectual concepts behind international news, and has won the National Newspaper Award, Canada’s counterpart to the Pulitzer Prize, on five occasions, as well as the Schelling Prize for Architectural Theory, the Donner Prize and the National Library of China Wenjin Book Award.

April 27th

Steve Paikin

Steve Paikin

Steve Paikin has anchored “The Agenda with Steve Paikin” on TVO for a decade. Now it has become one of the go-to places on air and online for intelligent debate and conversation about the big issues of our time. With the introduction of “alternative facts” as part of the journalistic lexicon south of the border, Paikin is now attempting to buck this regrettable trend from his perch at TVO.

Steve Paikin is the host of TVO’s flagship current affairs program, The Agenda with Steve Paikin, the gold standard for in depth of analysis and thoughtful debate in Canadian media. In more than 30 years in the business, Steve has built a sterling reputation as an eminently fair journalist who has moderated federal and Ontario election debates. Earlier in his career, Steve worked at CBC News as an anchor and correspondent, a reporter for the Hamilton Spectator and CHFI radio, as well as radio and television stations in Boston. Steve has authored seven books including his latest, Bill Davis: Nation Builder, and Not So Bland After All, has produced several feature-length documentaries, and reported from two different war zones. In October 2013, Steve became an educational ambassador beginning a five-year term as Chancellor of Laurentian University in Sudbury, where he received an Honorary Doctorate of Letters. Steve also has honorary degrees from Victoria University at the University of Toronto, McMaster University in Hamilton, and an honorary diploma from Humber College. In December of 2013, Steve was made an Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions as a journalist who engages, informs and educates viewers on a broad range of public policy issues, and was invested into the Order of Ontario in 2014.

Steve was born in Hamilton, Ontario and lives in Toronto.

May 4th

Bob Rae

Bob Rae

Bob Rae will be discussing the foundational question for Canada – the relationship between those who have been here for thousands of years, and those who have come after: the difficult truth about the traumatic nature of that relationship, and the steps – both political and personal – we need to take as a country to get to a point of reconciliation.

Bob Rae is a senior partner at Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP, where he works with First Nations as legal counsel, advisor, and negotiator. He served as Ontario’s 21st Premier from 1990 to 1995 and Interim Federal Leader of the Liberal Party in 2011- 2013. He was named Queen’s Counsel in 1984, appointed to the Privy Council of Canada in 1998, named an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2000, received the Order of Ontario in 2004 and Companion of the Order of Canada in 2015. In addition to his legal practice, Bob teaches at the University of Toronto as a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG), and as Distinguished Professor at Victoria College. He is also a Fellow at the Forum of Federations, and consults internationally on governance issues. He has also written five books, most recently “What’s Happened to Politics”. He writes and speaks regularly on public issues and also does ADR work with ADR Chambers.

 

May 11th

Nancy Bouchier & Ken Cruikshank

Nancy Bouchier & Ken Cruikshank

Bouchier and Cruikshank will explore the complicated relationship between Hamilton Harbour and the people who have lived on its shores in an examination of the recreational, industrial and environmental uses, past, present and future, of this vital North American watershed.

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Nancy Bouchier (Ph.D. Western Ontario), Professor of History at McMaster, focuses her research on issues of gender, social class, and the environment in the history of sport and physical activity. She is also interested in the relationship between sport and hegemony.  She is author of For Love of the Game: Amateur Sport in Small Town Ontario 1838-1895.

Ken Cruikshank (Ph.D. York), Professor of History and Dean of Humanities at McMaster, works on the history of business and of the administrative state in Canada and the United States, particularly between the 1880s and World War II. His publications include Close Ties: Railways, Government and the Board of Railway Commissioners, 1851-1933 and contributions to two collections of essays in Canadian business and economic history.

As long-time research collaborators, Ken and Nancy have been working on a longitudinal study of the state, the environment and recreation in the history of Hamilton Harbour. In 2007, they launched a documentary called The People and the Bay.   In 2016, UBC Press published their The People and the Bay: A Social and Environmental History of Hamilton Harbour, which won the 2017 Clio Prize for regional history from the Canadian Historical Association.

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